The Practice of Creativity

Exploring Flash Fiction

Posted on: September 22, 2014

I haven’t been able to take a writing workshop in some time, so I was looking forward to taking a ‘flash fiction’ class from acclaimed poet and short story enthusiast, Ruth Moose. I am still doing daily writing and am moving various projects forward, but there is a deliciousness and spontaneity that comes with creating fresh writing in a workshop. Until the last few years, I didn’t even believe that I could write flash fiction or short fiction. Every time I tried to write a short story, it would come out as a novella. After a semester long class with Ruth and exploring the form of short stories, I started to understand the demands of the short form. I also started voraciously reading short fiction. One time Ruth described the short story as having the length and character of a lovely dinner party. I understood then that one of my problems was that in many of my stories the characters were staying much longer and making it a sleep over party!

The workshop last week was so invigorating. We explored a variety of short fiction that ranged in style and content. We read T. Coraghessan Boyle’s ‘The Hit Man’ that chronicles the life of a hit man in episodic moments. It is both abstract (the hit man is always described with a black bag over his head), yet chilling. The piece below is an excerpt:

Excerpt:

Father’s Death

At breakfast the Hit Man slaps the cornflakes from his father’s bowl. Then wastes him.

Mother’s Death

The Hit man is in his early twenties. He shoots pool, lifts weights and drinks milk from the carton. His mother is in the hospital, dying of cancer or heart disease. The priest wears black. So does the Hit Man.

Sylvia Mullen Tohill’s ‘The Unfaithful Wife’* is about a woman who slyly undresses from her pajamas each night while her husband sleeps. This is her first paragraph:

Under the covers, she sometimes slipped out of her pajamas and slept nude beside her husband. She waited until he was snoring, then eased out of the bottoms—one leg, then the other—slipped an arm out of one sleeve, the other sleeve, then a time of listening before she lifted the top over her head and slid both garments under her pillows.

In the stories, we looked for where things turned and in short fiction, that moment is usually well delineated. We also noted that many times the main characters aren’t named.

We also read Jamaica Kincaid’s well anthologized ‘Girl’ and Carolyn Foushee’s ‘The Colonel’.

Ruth said that she loves the short form because of its complexity and yet accessible nature. She also loves it because there is currently a strong market for micro fiction, flash fiction and very short stories (100-1,000 words). Although short fiction requires a beginning, middle and end, I find that it is possible to leave some questions lingering and resonating then having everything perfectly wrapped up. I now enjoy writing short fiction and writing more of it has also allowed me to enter contests and get my work published.

Here are some writing exercises to try; try to keep these in the 200-750 word range:

-Write a short piece that is based on giving advice. In Kincaid’s ‘Girl’, the narrator is a young girl who hears her mother’s voice in her her head interspersing sexual advice with everyday ‘ladylike’ ways of being in the world:

Excerpt: this is how you sweep a whole house; this is how you sweep a yard; this is how you smile to someone you don’t like too much; this is how you smile to someone you don’t like at all; this is how you smile at someone you like completely

-Write a short piece about someone who comes close to telling an important truth, but stops

-Write a short piece about a couple standing in front of a door about to go into a party who begin to argue

-Write a short piece about a character standing in someone’s home and being troubled by what they notice displayed on their friend’s refrigerator

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5 Responses to "Exploring Flash Fiction"

I have often wondered about short fiction and what is flash fiction all about anyway? I’ve wondered if I could write it properly and effectively. Perhaps I should give it a try. Thanks for this informative post.

Hi Lynn,
Thanks for stopping by. Yes, it is hard to pin down the nature of flash fiction. You might want to check out the anthologies that Ruth recommended: MIcro-Fiction by Jerome Stern and Long Story Short by Marianne Gingher that have lots of great examples. Also, if you google ‘flash fiction’, you’ll find lots of examples on line and literary journals that solicit pieces. Glad you found this helpful.

Short fiction is a lot of fun, but it’s tougher than it looks.

Great post, Michelle. I’ve dabbled in this a bit, and had two very short stories published recently. The examples about the hitman and the woman undressing didn’t seem complete to me though. I loved “The Colonel” which was published as a prose poem. Haven’t read “The Girl” yet.

Hey Deborah,
Congrats on getting your work published. The ‘Hit Man’ is a much longer piece, probably about 1200 words in total and the other piece is just the first paragraph…I need to make that clear!
You’ll love ‘The Girl’.

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Michele Tracy Berger

Michele Tracy Berger

Author, Academic, Creativity Expert I'm an award winning writer.

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