The Practice of Creativity

Willpower, Commitment and Your Writing: Learning from Yoga and the Chakras

Posted on: May 27, 2013

Yoga has been an integral part of my life for the past twenty years. I am a yoga teacher and have become increasingly interested in exploring the relationship between yoga, creativity and writing. I have noticed that many people often feel so fatigued it prevents them from making time for their creative life. Restorative yoga postures can help relax the mind and body which then leads to greater energy for creative focusing. The practice of writing and the practice of yoga also need similar things from us: patience, devotion, activity, silence and reflection.

Through attention to the breath and gentle movement, yoga can help release the body’s wisdom to nurture the creative process.

Over the past 9 months, my writing teacher, Marjorie Hudson and I teamed up to plan a weekend beach retreat that would feature writing and yoga. Although I have taught ‘Yoga for Creative People’ workshops, what we were attempting to do was different. Marjorie would take care of the writing prompts and I would teach the yoga classes and intersperse meditation and stretching throughout our writing sessions. Marjorie is also a yoga enthusiast and understands the importance of movement for writers.

Last weekend, we traveled to a retreat center in Emerald Isle, NC and met the ten amazing writers who signed up for this weekend of exploration. About half of them had some knowledge of yoga and about half had never done yoga.

Each day of writing was interspersed with gentle yoga postures, meditation and breath exercises that support the creative process.

IMG_0971

We also came up with an original way to talk about stages in the writing life through exploring the chakras. ‘Chakra’ is the Sanskrit word for “wheel”. In yogic wisdom, the chakras are identified as an energy system in the body (from the spine to the top of the head). Each chakra is associated with particular talents, skills or gifts.  They are often described as colorful vibrating balls of light.

We used the chakra system as a way to metaphorically reflect on aspects of the writing life. When we gathered to do our daily writing, we had 7 candles that reflected the 7 main chakras and lit the appropriate candle to the exercises we were doing. Understanding the chakra system is complex and detailed. We, however, just wanted to give the participants a taste of the chakras and how they could think about their writing in new ways. The writers in the room were so open to what we had to offer. Marjorie and I lucked out!

IMG_0997

One of the writing and chakra exercises that helped participants go pretty deep was looking at the 3rd chakra.

Briefly, this chakra physically corresponds in the body through the solar plexus. It is seen as the seat of personal power and as medical intuitive Carolyn Myss notes it is “our personal power center, the magnetic core of our personality and ego.” (Anatomy of the Spirit: The Seven Stages of Power and Healing). The color associated with this chakra is yellow and emotionally it corresponds in the body to willpower, commitment, persistence, inner authority, personal responsibility and our ability to stand up for one’s self.

In introducing this topic, I led a guided meditation, asking participants to imagine the strength of the sun in their solar plexus.

Marjorie then read a short passage from To Kill a Mockingbird where Jem (the brother of Scout who is the narrator) runs to Arthur “Boo” Radley’s house (Boo is a strange reclusive character). She invited folks to freewrite for 20 minutes on either:

1)      The bravest kid I ever saw or 2) A time when I was afraid- and acted with courage.

People had the option of writing nonfiction or fiction. Stories and poems of exile, bravery, immigration, leaving difficult situations,and of standing up to inner and outer bullies poured out of the participants. Almost everyone in the room chose to write about a personal experience.

A little later, we talked about how important the message of this chakra was in relation to our writing lives. Marjorie and I asked for them to reflect on: What are your commitments to the writing life? Have they changed over time? How have you stood for your writing life? What shape do your commitments to your writing life take?

These are fruitful questions for writers and creative folk. In order to be productive and gain confidence, we must create structure and accountability in our creative lives. We must have the perseverance to keep going in the face of rejection and the daily grind of life. We have to make decisions about how to stay committed to a particular piece of writing (or creative work), when it feels like we have revised it for the 99th time and it is still not finished. Although we can keep an eye on the marketplace, we must draw on our inner authority to write the things in our heart that desire expression.

Sharon Blessum, one of the poets in the room, and I had a great discussion about how this chakra related to her writing life. She’s been writing all her life, so it’s not that she struggles with the commitment to sit down and write (often a challenge for beginning writers). But, the issue is that the fruits of her commitment to writing now perhaps requires a different level of support. Sharon realized that she’d been functioning like an isolated ‘Lone Ranger’ character in relation to her creative life. This practice has often left her feeling tired and frustrated. I suggested that the isolated, solitary mystical artist archetype is one that may require updating. I also suggested that maybe the commitment required for her writing life now is realizing that it’s OK to seek additional support to help her organize and create a pathway for her work.  This can be accomplished through writing coaches, workshops and even a virtual assistant. We both felt like this was useful territory to explore further. The next day, she delighted the group by sharing a poem that emerged from these reflections. I’m so glad she gave me permission to share it here:

HI HO SILVER

I am a Lone Ranger
I ride Silver
too fast
too many directions
because smoke signals
are in neon lights for me
even invisible messages
stop me in my tracks
challenge me to manage
this earthplane incarnation
while riding bareback
with full backpack
of paper and pens
to write every gd*%&  word
God is giving me
from the seven directions

I need a Tonto

Tonto would say
go away
mortal one
go away
pray
rest
I will
mail your poems
walk your dogs
feed your horse
clean your house
brush your kitty
publish your books
arrange your readings
massage your feet
manifest your vision

you go drum
flow on the river
I’ll be sure the sun
comes up

stand
stretch
breathe
up-dog
down-dog
lion
cobra
headstand
oh my

read the not-rejection letter
write
rest
above
all
rest

I’ll
keep
the world
spinning

©Sharon Blessum May 19, 2013

The workshop was a great success on multiple levels. Marjorie and I coached each other and offered the participants fresh ways to think about the writing life. People left with hearts open and pens drained (at least temporarily). I got to work with a dear friend and mentor and get a taste of how I can support others. A great way to kick off the summer!

I hope that you’ll take a moment to explore the writing prompts that we used. You may surprise yourself remembering your own acts of bravery.

For 20 minutes freewrite about:

1)The bravest kid I ever saw or 2) A time when I was afraid- and acted with courage.

For 20 minutes freewrite about:

What are your commitments to the writing life? Have they changed over time? How have you stood for your writing life? What shape do your commitments to your writing life take?

Advertisements

8 Responses to "Willpower, Commitment and Your Writing: Learning from Yoga and the Chakras"

Very interesting post, Michelle! A friend who teaches yoga and I recently spoke about doing the same thing — combining yoga and writing. I really enjoyed reading about how you and Marjorie put it together.

Hi Amanda,
Thanks so much! I think your yoga and writing retreat will be well received. There’s so much material to explore in this framework. I also like the work of Gail Sher and Laraine Herring, who both have books devoted to this subject. Feel free to FB for more info down the line.

Thanks for the info Michele. I will check out the authors you mention. Are you on Facebook? I just looked and couldn’t find you.

Michele, it was a magical weekend teaming up yoga and writing with the smell of the salty breakers.

This was my first exposure to yoga and I learned one thing pretty well—breathing in slowly and deeply and then out slowly and steadily. I’ve already put this technique to use with my writing and when stressed.

Thank you, Michele and Marjorie and all the other brave writers, for a great weekend.

It’s more than sweet that you included my poem here, dear Michele. I’m honored. I’m not quite simpatico with the paragraph preceding it.What I meant to communicate is that it’s stressful for one who loves the contemplative life, to take time/energy to do marketing and publishing searches. As a younger woman, I had a lot of things published and it was not that challenging to make it happen. At this time stage in life, time has a different perspective. Dealing with the outside world distracts me from the work of my soul. I loved your empathy, your support and willingness to help. But I don’t feel tired, frustrated, or isolated. I have great writing buddies for companions. I live in joy, especially in the writing process. And you are a joy to me.

Hi Sharon,
Thanks for stopping by. And, thanks for clarifying the creative processes through which you work. And, please forgive me for the misnaming your feelings about the creative process. More of us should ‘live in joy’, in both our writing and everyday lives. You are a joy to me, too!

Very glad I stopped to read this today! I am exploring the interaction between my meditation practice and writing…and yoga has become more a part of it, too. I had planned to teach a “writing and healing’ workshop this month, but I don’t think I was ready–ostensibly, I was Too Busy. It’s very easy to don the professional armor and blast forward full speed ahead, but I am feeling into the wisdom of paying attention to what’s inside, which is against my grain. Ouch! Will be attending a meditation and writing workshop in Seattle in June. Great to hear that others are also doing this work.

Hi Helen,
So glad that you stopped by, too. I think there is a lot of great work to be done in supporting writers through sharing meditation techniques. And, I totally hear you about ignoring our own inner signals and ‘blasting through’ something. Sounds like you’re listening to that inner voice though by stopping to rest and by planning to soak up the fruits of the Seattle retreat. Look forward to see what you’re going to create in the future!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Michele Tracy Berger

Michele Tracy Berger

Author, Academic, Creativity Expert I'm an award winning writer.

View Full Profile →

Follow me on Twitter

Follow The Practice of Creativity on WordPress.com
%d bloggers like this: